What Are We Told About the Health of Biden and Trump? They Decide

Nir Barzilai, M.D., and Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., M.S., comment on what Americans know—and don't know—about the health of President Joe Biden and presidential candidate Donald Trump. Dr. Barzilai is the Ingeborg and Ira Leon Rennert Chair in Aging Research and director of the Institute for Aging Research at Einstein. Dr. Verghese is professor and director of cognitive and motor aging in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology, director of the Jack and Pearl Resnick Gerontology Center at Einstein, and director of the Montefiore Einstein Center for the Aging Brain.


Walking on Curved Path Can Give Clues to Cognitive Decline, Researchers Find

Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., M.S., says a study that used a curved path to assess older adults' walking patterns adds to research that found non-cognitive symptoms, such as abnormal walking patterns, occur early in dementia. Dr. Verghese is professor of neurology and of medicine, director of cognitive and motor aging in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology, director of the Jack and Pearl Resnick Gerontology Center at Einstein, and director of the Montefiore Einstein Center for the Aging Brain.


Improving Recognition of Cognitive Decline and Racial Disparities in Underserved Communities

Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., M.S., talks about his new NIH-funded study to evaluate an Einstein-developed test for assessing cognitive impairment and dementia. Dr. Verghese is chief of the integrated divisions of cognitive and motor aging and of geriatrics at Einstein and Montefiore, the Murray D. Gross Memorial Faculty Scholar in Gerontology, director of the Resnick Gerontology Center, and professor in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology and of medicine at Einstein.


Biden Turns 80 and Joins Growing Ranks of Octogenarians Who Still Work

Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., M.S., explains that while mental processing speed slows as people age, he believes older workers often have better judgment and decision-making ability. Dr. Verghese is chief of the integrated divisions of cognitive and motor aging and of geriatrics at Einstein and Montefiore. He also is the Murray D. Gross Memorial Faculty Scholar in Gerontology, director of the Resnick Gerontology Center, and professor in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology and of medicine at Einstein.


Your Walking Speed Could Indicate Dementia

Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., M.S., comments on a study that found adults over age 65 had an increased risk of dementia if they had both a decrease in their walking speed and signs of cognitive function decline. Dr. Verghese is chief of the integrated divisions of cognitive and motor aging and of geriatrics at Einstein and Montefiore. He also is the Murray D. Gross Memorial Faculty Scholar in Gerontology, director of the Resnick Gerontology Center, and professor in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology and of medicine at Einstein.

Additional coverage includes MedPage Today, Medscape


Apathy Could Lead to a Greater Risk of Dementia, Study Finds

Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., M.S., comments on a study that found apathy in older adults could be a risk factor for dementia and notes his prior research suggests that addressing apathy could help delay the onset of dementia. Dr. Verghese is chief of geriatrics at Einstein and Montefiore and director of the Montefiore Einstein Center for the Aging Brain.


A Lifelong Fitness Fan Meets Her Match With Tap

Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., comments on the cognitive benefits of group dancing for seniors. Dr. Verghese is chief of geriatrics at Einstein and Montefiore and director of the Montefiore Einstein Center for the Aging Brain.


Is Dancing the Kale of Exercise?

Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., discusses his New England Journal of Medicine study that found dancing was associated with a reduced risk of developing dementia. Dr. Verghese is chief of geriatrics at Einstein and Montefiore and director of the Montefiore Einstein Center for the Aging Brain.


Blood Pressure Linked to Lesions, Signs of Alzheimers in Autopsied Brains

Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., comments on a new study exploring the link between blood pressure and brain health in the elderly. Dr. Verghese is chief of geriatrics at Einstein and Montefiore and director of the Montefiore Einstein Center for the Aging Brain.


How You Walk Could Flag Mental Decline

The research collaboration between Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., and Roee Holtzer, Ph.D., has advanced our understanding of mobility and its link to cognition. Dr. Verghese is director of the Montefiore Einstein Center for the Aging Brain and Dr. Holtzer is professor of neurology at Einstein.


Reuters interviews Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., about his research that determined a method of predicting the risk of falling for healthy, older adults. Dr. Verghese is professor and director of the division of cognitive & motor aging in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology at Einstein and director of the Montefiore Einstein Center for the Aging Brain.

More coverage on this story

HealthDay.com
US News & World Report
Medscape


The Washington Post reports on research by Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., that predicts pre-dementia by measuring walking speed and cognitive abilities. The quick, low-tech test determined that 1 in 10 older adults have pre-dementia. The study involved 27,000 people in 7 countries. It found that those who had unusually slow walking speed and cognitive complaints are twice as likely to develop dementia within 12 years. Dr. Verghese is professor of neurology at Einstein and chief of the division of geriatrics at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center.

More coverage on this story

NPR
Huffington Post Canada
Medscape


Treating vascular dementia patients with the drug Cerebrolysin may not help patients to a meaningful extent, explains Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., in Reuters.  Dr. Verghese notes that although a new study found improvement in patients on the drug was statistically significant, it was so slight that patients and family members wouldn’t be likely to notice it. Cerebrolysin is not approved by the FDA, but is available outside the U.S. Dr. Verghese is professor of neurology at Einstein and chief of the division of geriatrics at Einstein and Montefiore Medical Center.


U.S. News & World Report (via HealthDay) interviews Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., about new research indicating that certain antidepressants can be used to treat depression in Parkinson's patients without worsening their motor problems. Dr. Verghese is professor in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology and the Murray D. Gross Memorial Faculty Scholar in Gerontology at Einstein and chief of geriatrics at Montefiore Medical Center.


The Chicago Tribune interviews Joe Verghese, M.B.B.S., for an article on how participation in an improvisational comedy group may improve the lives of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Verghese notes that these activities, like other mentally stimulating pastimes, might build "cognitive reserve," or resilience in the brain. People with large amounts of cognitive reserve might, for instance, begin showing symptoms of Alzheimer's at 75, instead of at 70. Dr. Verghese is professor in the Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology and the Murray D. Gross Memorial Faculty Scholar in Gerontology.